Sixteenth Biennial Report

SIXTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT
OF THE

IOWA
COLLEGE FOR THE BLIND

LOCATED AT VINTON,

TO THE

GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF IOWA

JUNE 30, 1883
 

PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY.

DES MOINES:
GEO. E. ROBERTS, STATE PRINTER.


TRUSTEES

Hon. M. H. WESTBROOK, President
Hon. SAMUEL H. WATSON, Treasure
Hon. JACOB SPRINGER
Hon. J. F. BARCLAY
Hon. C. O. HARRINGTON
Hon. J. F. WHITE, M. D.

OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE.

Principal
THOMAS F. McCUNE, A. M.

Steward
JAMES A. BROWN.

Matron
Mrs. HOMAR JAMES.

TEACHES IN THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT.
Miss SADIE E. WAYCHOFF, Assistant Principal
Miss HORTENSE McCRORY
GEORGE W. TANNEHILL

TEACHERS IN THE PRIMARY DEPARTMENT.
Miss LORANA MATTICE
Miss ANNIE SIDWELL
Miss MAGGIE A. DAVIS

TEACHERS IN THE MUSICAL DEPARTMENT
T. S. SLAUGHTER, Musical Director.
Mrs. JOHN CISNA
Miss MILLIE DOWNS

TEACHERS IN THE WORK DEPARTMENT
JOHN CISNA, Broom-making.
LORANA MATTICE, Fancy Work
A. C. FERREBY, Mattress Shop
AMIE HERRIOTT, Sewing Machine

PHYSICIAN.
C. C. GRIFFIN, M. D.
 


 

REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES.

To The Honorable, The General Assembly Of The State Of Iowa:

     The undersigned Trustees respectfully submit the following as their report of the management and present condition of the Iowa College for the Blind.

     The period covered by this report, viz.: September 30, 1881, June 30, 1883, has been one of the marked prosperity in the history of the College. Especially is this true of the term closing June 30, 1883, the attendance of pupils having increased from ninety to one hundred and forty-one.

     This increased attendance, together with the liberal provisions made by the Nineteenth General Assembly for the current expenses of the College, has enabled your Trustees to maintain not only the character and efficiency of the Institution, but to greatly advance the same.

     The decease of Rev. Robert Carothers, Superintendent, March 17, 1882, made necessary a re-organization of the school. Your Trustees were fortunate in securing the services of T. F. McCune (for five years Assistant Superintendent of the Institution), for the responsible position of Superintendent. Under his direction, assisted by a competent corps of officers and teachers, marked progress has been made in all departments of the College, and harmony and good order prevail.

     The College buildings and grounds have received proper attention and repairs, and are now in good condition, with the exception of the slate roof of the College building proper. Your Trustees are of the opinion the same was improperly constructed. The freezing and thawing during the winter breaks the slates, and the strong winds blow them off the roof. The result is leakage and great damage to the interior of the building. We think it would be economy for the State to appropriate a sum sufficient for a new roof to the College building.

     The appropriation made by the Nineteenth General Assembly, for the purpose of building a iron fence in front of the College grounds, has been expended, and we now have in position a substantial iron fence, costing in the aggregate $4,089.00. This fence adds greatly to the appearance of the College grounds, and is creditable to the State. The balance of the appropriation for this purpose, viz.: $411, has been conveyed back into the State Treasury.

     The one thousand dollars appropriated by the Nineteenth General Assembly for the purpose of employing an expert occulist to examine the eyes of the pupils and operate on such as were likely to be benefitted thereby, has been wholly expended in the employment of Drs. C. M. Hobby, of Iowa City, and E. H. Hazen, of Davenport, both eminent in their specialties, and well know to, and indorsed by, the profession of the State. These gentlemen made operations on pupils with varying results, but all more or less favorable to the patients.

     For a more detailed statements, you are respectfully referred to the report of the experts, hereto attached and made a part of this report.

     The Board are unanimous in the opinion that the success attending the first experiment of the kind, will warrant another appropriation for the same purpose. The Board would further suggest that in the event of another appropriation being made for this purpose, that they be allowed discretionary power as to having the operations performed within or without the Institution, as may best subserve the interests of both the Institution and parties.

     The official reports of the Principal and Treasurer are herewith submitted, to which your attention is invited, as showing in detail the educational and financial condition of the Institution.

     The pianos belonging to the Institution have been in constant use from ten to twenty years, and are nearly worn out. They should be replaced by new instruments. The College needs for the Musical Department at least six new pianos, two organs, and several new horns for the use of the orchestra. We ask you for an appropriation of three thousand dollars for the purpose of purchasing musical instruments and music for use of the College.

     For the purchase of bedsteads, bedding, and furniture, we ask for an appropriation of three thousand dollars.

     Constant repairs are needed to properly protect the buildings and heating apparatus of the Institution; and contingencies are likely to arise making necessary expenditures that cannot properly be charged to the general expenses of the College. We ask an appropriation of twenty-five hundred dollars for the contingent expenses and general repair fund.

     We ask for an appropriation of $500 for making needful additions to the library, and for providing the necessary school apparatus.

Respectfully submitted
M. H. Westerbrook
Jacob Springer
C. O. Harrington
S. H. Watson
J. F. Barclay
J. F. White

 

 



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REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL.

To his Excellency, Buren R. Sherman, Governor of Iowa:      Sir—I have the honor to submit the following report of the Iowa College for the Blind, for the period beginning September 30, 1881, and ending June 30, 1883.

REV. ROBERT CAROTHERS.

     The Principal by whom the last report was prepared, Rev. Robert Carothers, after a long and painful illness, passed to his eternal home on the 17th day of March, 1882. I would be wanting in gratitude, as well as in duty, if I did not take the first opportunity to put upon record the high admiration of myself and colleagues for this noble man. It was my privilege to be his assistant for five years, during which time, without an exception, our relations were of the most pleasant character. In his death the State has lost a servant, scholarly in his attainments, elevated in his sentiments, wise and loving in the government of those committed to his care.

OFFICERS AND TEACHERS.

     The Trustees, at their annual meeting, June 15, 1882, decided that the interests of the Institution would be subserved by the release of the Principal from all financial care. Accordingly Mr. Jas. A. Brown, of Vinton, was elected Steward and general business manager, to receive his trust from the members of the Board, and be held responsible by them alone. This plan has been highly satisfactory to Mr. Brown and myself, and is, I believe, the only true one on which larger educational institutions may be conducted.

     It is with a feeling of thankfulness that I acknowledge the faithful and efficient work of the officers and teachers of the Institution, the spirit of unity and harmony that has prevailed among them, their hearty co-operation and loyalty in carrying out all plans proposed. Whatever prosperity the school has enjoyed during the period, is mainly due to their activity and zeal.

NUMBER OF PUPILS.

At the close, June 14, 1882, of the school term commencing September 7, 1881,  
   
The number of male pupils enrolled was      42
The number of female pupils enrolled was    52
The whole number of pupils instructed during the term was 94
   
At the close, June 6, 1883, of the school term commencing September 6, 1882"  
   
The number of male pupils enrolled was 60
The number of female pupils enrolled was     81
The whole number of pupils instructed during the term was 141

 

     As will be seen, the greatest number of pupils enrolled within the two school terms embraced in this report was 141.

     During the first term of this period,

 

The number of male pupils admitted was            7
The number of female pupils admitted was            8
The whole number of pupils admitted during the term was            15
              
During the first term of this period,             
The number of male pupils admitted was            13
The number of female pupils admitted was            22
The whole number of pupils admitted during the term was            35

 

     The whole number of pupils admitted during the period embraced in this report was fifty.

NATIVITY OF PUPILS ADMITTED DURING THE PERIOD.

 

Iowa            27
Wisconsin   4
Indiana   2
Nebraska   1
Illinois   4
Maryland   1
Ireland   1
Missouri   3
Scotland   2
New York   2
Norway   1
Canada   1
Ohio   1

 

 

CAUSE OF BLINDNESS
OF THOSE
ADMITTED DURING THE PERIOD.

Sore eyes            3
Small-pox   1
Congenital   4
Brain fever   2
Ulcerated cornea   1
Scarlet fever   3
Unknown   14
Accident   4
Cholera infantum   1
Sympathetic Ophthalmia   1
Spine fever   1
Inflammation   3
Purulent Conjunctivitis   1
Pneumonia   2
Scrofula   4
Neuralgia   1
Measles   1
Cataract   1
Epilepsy   1
Sun stroke   1

 

AGE OF PUPILS ADMITTED THE PERIOD.

Under ten years            7
Under fifteen years and under ten   13
Under twenty years and over fifteen   11
Over twenty years   19

 

     The following (able shows the biennial increase in the number of pupils from 1853 to 1883:

 

Number of
Reports
Year Principal Number of
pupils
admitted
biennially
Total to
date of
Report
first Report 1853 Samuel Bacon 10 10
Second Report 1855 Samuel Bacon 11 21
Third Report 1857 Samuel Bacon 11 32
Fourth Report 1859 Samuel Bacon 20 52
Fifth Report 1861 Samuel Bacon 22 74
Sixth Report 1863 Orlando Clarke 15 89
Seventh Report 1865 Reed Wilkinson 31 120
Eighth Report 1867 James L. Geddes 19 139
Ninth Report 1869 S. A. Knapp 34 173
Tenth Report 1871 S. A. Knapp 65 238
Eleventh Report 1873 S. A. Knapp 31 269
Twelfth Report 1875 Orlando Clarke 46 315
Thirteenth Report 1877 Robert Carothers 51 366
Fourteenth Report 1879 Robert Carothers 33 399
Fifteenth Report 1881 Robert Carothers 38 437
Sexteenth Report 1883 Thomas F. McCune 50 487

 

     From special reports made to the Principal of this Institution by county superintendents of public instruction, from copies of the late census report, from reports of county auditors, and from information derived from citizens throughout the State, the following table is compiled, showing, by counties, the whole number of blind in the State, the number under twenty years of age, and the number of pupils enrolled last term.

 

County Whole
number
of blind
Number
under
20 years of age
Number of
Pupils in
College
Last Term
Adair 9 2 1
Adams 7   3
Allamakee 26 1  
Appanoose 21 5 1
Audubon 3 1  
Benton 21 4 7
Black Hawk 11 2 2
Boone 16   2
Bremer 11 1  
Buchanan 17 2  
Buena Vista 5 2 2
Butler 10 3  
Calhoun 3    
Carroll 3 1 1
Cass 4    
Cedar 24   5
Cerro Gordo 5   1
Cherokee 5 2  
Chickasaw 10    
Clarke 10 4  
Clay 3 1 1
Clayton 27 1 1
Clinton 25 4 3
Crawford 10 1 1
Dallas 9 2  
Davis 28 2 2
Decatur 21 2 2
Delaware 30 3  
Des Moines 32   3
Dickinson 1 1 1
Dubuque 21 1  
Emmet      
Fayette 25 8 2
Floyd 14 1  
Franklin 9    
Fremont 43 3 2
Greene 8   1
Grundy 9 2  
Guthrie 4 1  
Hamilton 11 3 2
Hancock 2 1 1
Hardin 11 1 1
Harrison 14 3 3
Henry 14 1  
Howard 10    
Humboldt      
Ida 4 1 1
Iowa 17 2 5
Jackson 21 4 2
Jasper 19 2 2
Jefferson 21 3 1
Hohnson 25 1 1
Jones 9 2  
Keokuk 33 5 3
Kossuth 3 2  
Lee 51 4 1
Linn 35 3  
Louisa 19 2 3
Lucas 8 1  
Lyon 2 2  
Madison 13 4 3
Mahaska 18 2 2
Marion 39 3 3
Marshall 16 6 1
Mills 9 2  
Mitchell 13 6 6
Monona 12 4  
Monroe 13 1  
Montgomery 5 5  
Muscatine 24   1
O'Brian 5 3 1
Osceola      
Page 9 1  
Palo Alto 3 1  
Plymouth 7    
Pocahontas 5 4  
Polk 32 9 9
Pottawattamie 13 2 2
Poweshiek 7 1  
Ringgold 7 3 1
Sac 3 1  
Scott 17 7 2
Shelby 9 2 2
Sioux 3 2  
Story 12 2  
Tama 21 11 6
Taylor 7    
Union 4 2 1
Van Buren 16 2  
Wapello 23 5 1
Warren 24 2 2
Washington 16 3 3
Wayne 9   2
Webster 9 3 2
Winnebago 1    
Winneshiek 33 7 4
Woodbury 4    
Worth 5 1  
Wright 3   2
Dakota Terr.                         6   
  1339 210 141

 

     In carrying out the wish of the State that every blind person of suitable school age and capacity, should be educated, many difficulties are to be met. Institutions for the defective classes are so without the usual channels in which the thoughts of men run, as to engage the public attention but seldom. Notwithstanding constant effort made for years past to bring the advantages of this school to the notice of parents and friends of blind children, the gravest misapprehensions still prevail as to its character, aims and terms of admission. By continuing correspondence with county superintendents of common schools, county auditors and supervisors, parents themselves, and benevolent persons wherever they may be found, it is to be hoped that, in time, a full and unprejudiced knowledge of this Institution will be found in every home of the blind.

THE LITERARY DEPARTMENT.

The course of study here given will show the literary status of theCollege.

FIRST PRIMARY.
 

CLASS A.
Raised Print—Primer and Butler's first reader.
Object Lessons, with reference to drill in language.
Oral Spelling—Swinton's word primer, first year's work.
Light Gymnastics.
Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, no result being larger than 20.

 

CLASS B.
Raised Print—Butler's second and third readers.
Language—Swinton's language primer.
Oral Spelling—Swinton's word primer, second year's work.
Light Gymnastics.
Addition, Subtraction. Multiplication and Division of numbers less than one thousand.
Geography—Outline maps.

SECOND PRIMARY.

CLASS A.
Raised Print—First star reader.
N. Y. Point—Primer aud first reader.
OraJ Spelling— Swinton's word book, first year's work.
Language—Swinton's language lessons, to page 84.
Light Gymnastics.
Geography—Harper's introductory, to page 50.
Colburn's Mental Arithmetic, to section 12.

 

CLASS B.
Raised Print—Second star reader.
N. Y. Point— Second and third readers.
Spelling in Point—Swinton's word book.

 

SECOND YEAR'S WORK.
Language—Swinton's language lessons, completed.
Light Gymnastics.
Geography—Harper's introductory, completed.
Colburn's Mental Arithmetic, completed.

INTERMEDIATE.

CLASS A.
Raised Point—United States history.
Spelling in Point— Words in history and geography.
Arithmetic—"Robinson's elementary," to part second.
United States History—"Anderson's grammar school," to Revolution.
Harper's School Geography, to Europe.
Swinton's School Composition.

 

CLASS B.
Eaised Print—United States History.
Spelling in Point—Words in history and geography.
Arithmetic—"Robinson's elementary," part second.
United States History, completed.
Harper's School Geography, completed.
Swinton's School Composition.

JUNIOR DEPARTMENT.

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR THIRD YEAR
Penmanship, Penmanship Penmanship
Arithmetic, Arithmetic Arithmetic
Grammar, Physiology Natural Philosophy
Physical Geography History History

SENIOR DEPARTMENT.

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR THIRD YEAR
Algebra Algebra Geometry
Rhetoric Moral Philosophy Mental Philosophy
Chemistry Civil Government English Literature
Zoology American Literature Logic

 

     The educational work of the Institution begins on the first Wednesday in September, and ends on the first or second Wednesday in June next, when the pupils return to their homes for the summer. At the close, June 6, 1883, of the school work for the period covered by this report:

 

The number of pupils enrolled in the first primary class was            32
The number enrolled in the second primary class was   16
The number enrolled in the intermediate class was   25
The number enrolled in the second junior class was   15
The number enrolled in the third junior class was   12
The number enrolled in the first senior class was   7
The number enrolled in the second senior class was   5
The number enrolled in the third senior class was   6
The number enrolled, irregular in course, was      9
The whole number in literary department was   127

 

     Substantial and satisfactory progress has been made in all the branches taught. The teachers have not spared themselves; the students, in the main, have been diligent and attentive. One hour of each day, save Saturday, has been devoted to reading and study of the best literature. Saturday evenings have been at the disposal of the Literary Society, a fine body organized in 1877, by the older pupils, and for the older pupils. By limiting the age at which persons should be eligible to membership, by a strict government according to parliamentary principles, and by a marked cultivation, which the active ones have been able to acquire, the members themselves have created a sentiment in favor of literary attainment which no faculty could hope ever to do.

     At the close of last term the following persons, having completed the course of study, received certificates of graduation:

 

Eva Cassels, Empire City, Dakota.
Emma Magoon, Millersburg, Iowa.
Christine Lemberg, Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
Alcinda Jones, Drakeville, Iowa.
Mary Harter, Centerville, Iowa.
David M. Davis, West Troy, Iowa.

 

     These were among the brightest students in college. Their friends confidently expect them to fill useful and happy careers.

     Our facilities in this department are limited. We have one small library of standard works, and another of raised-print and point books; but of school apparatus we have comparatively nothing. The necessity of globe, shells, stuffed animals and birds, mechanical appliances for illustrating the principles of chemistry and natural philosophy, will be so apparent to you as to need no comment from me.

THE MUSICAL DEPARTMENT.

     The following is a summary of the number of pupils in this department:

 

In piano music            97
Vocal culture -- advanced choir   53
Vocal culture -- primary choir   48
Fourth harmony class   41
Third harmony class   23
Second harmony class   23
First harmony class (advanced)   15
Orchestra   21
Brass band   12
Violin   26
Guitar   15
Organ   2
Clarionet   1
Flute   1

 

     The new-comer, if possessing any musical ability whatever, is enrolled in the fourth harmony or rudiment class; the second or primary choir; and at the same time commences the study and practice of piano playing. Piano, harmony, and vocal culture are continued throughout the whole course, during the latter part of which, instruction as to the best method of teaching seeing pupils, is given one day in the week. The musical director, in examining every student bi-monthly, brings the work of each teacher under his own supervision. We feel that this department will compare favorably with that of any similar Institution; but, as it seems to those who are in a position to know, its needs should be carefully considered ere long. Two of our pianos were purchased six years ago. The remaining ten have been in the Institution from eight to twenty years. They have been in constant use at least ten hours a day for nine months of every twelve; our performers, in general, are young and inclined to be careless; the steam-heated atmosphere of the building is especially trying to musical instruments. The effect of such causes is plain. That the work in this department may keep progress with the times, we feel compelled to express the hope that your Legislature will allow the appropriation asked.

THE INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT.

     The following is a summary of the number of pupils in this department:

 

Whole number taking lessons in bead-work was            51
Whole number taking lessons in sewing was   23
Whole number taking lessons in cane-seating was   22
Whole number taking lessons in knitting was   18
Whole number taking lessons in crocheting was   18
Whole number taking lessons in mattress work was   13
Whole number taking lessons in broom making was   13

 

     This department has enjoyed more than its accustomed share of prosperity. It is a school of trades in which the element of profit to the Institution has a secondary place; but owing to the skill and discretion of the instructors it has been more than self-supporting. For a financial statement you are referred to the report of the Treasurer.

CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE.

     The discipline of the Institution has been mild but firm. Through the influence of the leading pupils a good moral tone has been infused throughout the school. Seventy-five per cent of the students gave no cause for censure or correction during the year, and of the remaining twenty-five per cent, one half were guilty of offense through thoughtlessness rather than intention. Demerits in the case of older pupils, and a few hours confinement in the hall or library in the case of younger ones, have been found, in all instances save one, to meet the demands of good order. It was thought best to suspend one young man for disobedience, with the understanding, however, that whenever he could obey' the regulations of the Institution he would be welcomed back, and gladly. *

     Harlin Bowman died on the 13th of January last, of cerebral hemorrhage. Silas Waters returned to his home on the 20th day of February last, where he has since died of consumption. The general health of the Institution has been good. Our arrangements for gymnastic work have not been such as we could wish, but by some devices of our own we will be able to give special attention hereafter to physical exercise.

CONCLUSION.

In the names of the faculty and students I would express to Rev. Eugene Avery, of Vinton, our sincere thanks for his instructive and entertaining lectures delivered before the school; to Rev. William Brush, D. D., and A. Haines, Esq., for services on Literary Prize Committee; to Mrs. L. T. Sheets, Miss A. Boyd, and Miss Hattie Hawkins, all of Vinton, for services on Musical Prize Committee; to the Eagle, Herald, and Observer, of Vinton. State Press, of Iowa City. Excelsior, of Maquoketa. Republican, of Marengo. Goodson Gazette, of Staunton, Va. Mitchell County News, of Mitchell. State Leader, of Des Moines. The Union, of Belle Plaine. Iowa South- West, of Missouri Valley. The Times, of Cedar Rapids. Missouri Valley Times, of Missouri Valley. Mutes' Companion, of Faribault, Minn. The Hub, of Harlan. Decorah Journal, of Decorah, for papers sent to the Institution. I would also express to the Trustees my high sense of the kindness, support and courtesy which they have always shown toward me. I have the honor to be, Your obedient servant,

 

Thomas F. McCune.

 

 



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