Fifth Biennial Report




Report of the Trustees                         Report of the Superintendent




 

 

 

 

FIFTH BIENNIAL REPORT
OF THE

IOWA INSTITUTION
FOR THE
EDUCATION OF THE BLIND

AT IOWA CITY,

TO THE
NINTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY
OF THE
STATE OF IOWA

DECEMBER 31, 1861

IOWA CITY, IOWA

WILLIAM CRUM PRINTERS

1861

OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTION

TRUSTEES

R. WALKER, President.
CLARK MILLER, Secretary.
R. HUTCHINSON, Treasurer.

ROBERT WALKER,
ROBERT HUTCHINSON,
ROBERT GILCRIST,
H. D. McKAY,

Ex-Officio.

THE GOVERNOR,
THE SECRETARY OF STATE,
THE PRINCIPAL OF THE INSTITUTION.

TEACHERS.

SAMUEL BACON, Principal,
CLARK MILLER, Assistant,
S. H. PRICE, Teacher of Music,
SARAH K. BACON, Matron,
SARAH J. BLISS, Assistant Matron.
JOHN CISNA, Assistant in Mechanical Department.

 

 


       

 

 

REPORT
OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES
OF THE
INSTITUTION
FOR THE
INSTRUCTION OF THE BLIND

      To the Hon. the General Assembly of the State of Iowa:

     Gentlemen: -- In conformity with Sec 2149 of Chapter 90 of the Code, the Board of Trustees, charged with the management of the Iowa Institution for the Education of the Blind, would respectfully submit this the Fifth Biennial Report of their official labors on behalf of the State.

     It is a source of extreme gratification to the Board to be able to report the continued prosperity of the Institution. Another two years experience, with this one of the educational interests of the State, has but served to increase their convection of its utility, and they would earnestly commend it to the fostering care of the Legislature.

     The number of pupils now enjoying the advantages of the Institution, is forty, a number far short of our anticipation, yet as many, perhaps, ad in the depressed state of the times we had a right to expect. The parents of the unfortunate blind being usually persons of small means, they, even in the most prosperous times, scarcely feel themselves able to incur the expense of clothing and bringing their children to the Institution.

     The Institution, was established for the benefit of he blind of the State, and it is desirable that the largest possible number of this unfortunate class should avail themselves of its advantages, the Board would therefore respectfully recommend the passage of an act in substance providing for furnishing clothing to each pupil as are not able to procure it themselves, at the expense of their respective counties; and making it incumbent on the County Supervisors to ascertain the persons within the limits of their county, who are of such condition and age to claim the instruction of the Institution, and to aid and induce them to take advantage of it.

     The Industrial Department, on account of the small demand and low price in the market of the articles manufactured therein, has been carried on to no greater extent than that sufficient to furnish instruction and labor to the pupils.

     The lease of the building now occupied by the institution expires on the first day of July, 1863, and if the Legislature contemplate the removal of the Institution in the following vacation it will be necessary to pass an act at the present session to that effect and appropriate the sum of at least five thousand dollars for making the removal, for furnishing the new edifice, and erecting suitable out-buildings.

     In regard to the studies pursued and the trades taught, we refer you to the report of the Principal of the Institution, which is herewith submitted, which also contains a more definite statement of the conditions of the Institution, its progress and management.

     For the number, names, ages, sex and cause of blindness of pupils, see annexed statement marked A.

     The receipts and disbursements of the Institution for the two years ending Dec. 31, 1861, are as follows:

Balance on hand as per last report,

          

$  1,534.48

Orders on Auditor of State,

          

14,575.00

Other sources,

          

      300.70

Total,

          

$16,410.18

Amount paid out during said term,

          

13,937.83

Balance on hand,

          

$  2,472.35

 

     For a more full and detailed exhibit of the expenses of the Institution, see report of the Principal.

     The very liberal provision made by the Legislature for the support of the Institution is deemed amply sufficient under its present organization.

     All of which is respectfully submitted.

ROBERT WALKER. President of the Board.
Iowa City, December 31, 1861.

 



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REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL.

To the Trustees of the
     Iowa Institution for the Education of the Blind:

     Gentlemen:---In presenting this my fifth biennial report, as it is my last, permit me to thank you Messrs. Walker, Hutchinson and McCleary, (as the business of the Board has ben left entirely with you for a number of years,) for the uniform kindness you have shown in seconding all my plans to make the institution what it was designed. I think it has never fell to the lot of any institution to have more efficient trustees than you have been. It is a matter of regret that the Hon. G. W. McCleary, whose time expired last January, was not re-appointed, as he had been a trustee for eight years and was conversant with all the affairs of the Institution.

     It is now more than eighteen years since I commenced teaching the Blind. This is the second institution I have established, and having labored here for nearly ten years, I am tired and wish to terminate my connection with this institution by the beginning of the next term. Whatever occupation I may hereafter pursue I shall always feel lively interest in the Iowa Institution for the Education of the Blind.

     Seventy-five pupils have been admitted since the commencement of the institution, five of whom have died, thirty discharged, leaving at present forty. As there were forty-two in attendance last year, it was reasonably expected there would be fifty this, but times are such that it is almost impossible for them to get here.

     The law under which the Institution is organized ought to be amended fixing a definite time that the trustees shall qualify and enter upon their duties. Some provision ought to be made for clothing each pupil as are not able to clothe themselves. As yet the Institution has felt no great inconvenience from this, but if not remedied it will eventually embarrass the finances. The best method would be for the Institution to furnish them and call upon the respective counties to which they belong for the same. For the support of the Institution no better method can be devised than it now has.

     Miss. M. C. Cristy who had been assistant Matron for a number of years resigned the 1st of April, 1860, and her place was filled to the end of the term by Miss. Sarah Patton. Mr. W. W. Happy was appointed teacher and entered upon his duties the 1st Sept. 1860, but owing to bad health resigned in May. The Institution feels the loss of Mr. H. Much, as he was an excellent teacher. Miss Sarah J. Bliss has filled the place of Assistant Matron since the first of March, 1861, with credit to herself, and Mr. Clarke Miller that of teacher since the first of Sept.; they are both attentive to their duties, Mr. S. H. Price has discharged the duties of teacher of music in a highly satisfactory manner.

     The course of instruction is thorough and as extensive as in most similar institutions. There are three departments, Industrial, Musical and Academical, which have devoted to them respectively two, three and four hours a day. In the Industrial department, the males are employed in brush and broom making; the females are employed in sewing, plane and fancy knitting and bead work; a number of them have learned to use Wheeler & Wilson’s Sewing Machines with success.

     The following is a statement of the operations of this department.

1860, Jan. 1.

 

To material on had,

     

$331.81

     

 

 

 

To manufactured articles on hand,

 

96.20

 

 

1860, Dec. 1.

 

To cost of materials since Jan. 1. ‘60,

 

  201.41

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$629.42

1861, Dec. 1.

 

By material on hand,

 

$296.90

 

 

 

 

By manufactured articles on hand,

 

186.35

 

 

 

 

By sales since Jan. 1st, ‘60,

 

  234.80

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$718.05

 

 

Net gain,

 

 

 

$  88.63

 

 

     Music embraces the theory and composition, as well as vocal and instrumental.

     The Academical course for the past two years has embraced Reading Raised Print, Writing, Grammar, Logic, Geography, Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, and Natural Philosophy.

     The following is a summary of the expenditures of the Institution since the 1st January, 1860:

     A statement of the monthly expenditures accompanies this, vouchers for which have been approved and filed with the Secretary.

Respectfully submitted,
SAMUEL BACON, Principal

Salaries,

 

$4,307.00

     

 

Rent,

 

452.50

 

 

Traveling,

 

391.50

 

 

Printing,

 

15.50

 

 

Groceries and provisions,

 

3,571.15

 

 

Furnishing,

 

838.49

 

 

Labor,

 

667.47

 

 

Music and Instruments,

 

459.51

 

 

Books and Stationary,

 

342.77

 

 

Fuel and Light,

 

832.02

 

 

Industrial Department,

 

201.41

 

 

Medical attendance medicine,

 

222.25

 

 

Clothing,

 

136.01

 

 

Repairs,

 

727.98

 

 

Miscellaneous expenses,

 

    445.27

 

 

 

 

 

 

$13,637.83

Estimated expenses for December,

 

 

 

     300.00

 

 

 

 

$13,937.83

       


NOTICE TO APPLICANTS
Institution for the Instruction of the blind

Located at Iowa City

 

     The annual term commences on the first Monday of September of each year, and ends the third Saturday of June.

     Scholars from Iowa will be provided with board, washing, &c., at the expense of the Institution. Their friends will only be required to supply them with proper clothing, and to be at the expense of their traveling to and from the Institution.

     Pupils will be admitted from other States, on the payment of one hundred dollars per term. In every application for the admission of pupils, answers to the following questions are to be given: If they are carefully and correctly answered, and the answers forwarded to the principal of the Institution, at Iowa City, the relatives of friends of the applicant will be informed whether he or she can be admitted; and if admitted, at what time.

     No blind person shall be brought to the Institution as a pupil before a letter of admission has been received from the principal.

 

QUESTIONS.

 

1. What is the name, age and residence of the applicant? Who is the nearest friend, and to what post office should the reply be sent?

2. Is the applicant totally blind, or what degree of sight does he or she possess?

3. At what age did the applicant become blind, and from what cause?

4. What instruction has the applicant received?

5. Is the applicant of sound health, and of sufficient mental and bodily capacity to receive instruction?
 

 



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